Aug 2016 updated: Actualtests Oracle 1Z0-058 test preparation 31-40

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Q31. You want to install a database patch on your eight-node cluster by using Opatch with, the minimum amount of down time to your cluster nodes. 

You have already been prompted for the first set of nodes and you replied with node names RACNODE1 RACNODE2, and RACNODE3. 

Which two statements are true about the procedure for minimizing down time? 

A. The patch must be propagated to, applied, and the inventory updated on all the remaining nodes before restarting the instances on the first set of nodes. 

B. When the first set of nodes has been patched, the instances on the remaining nodes are shut down automatically by opatch. 

C. The instances must be started on the first set of nodes and then stopped on the remaining set to make certain that some nodes are always available. 

D. When the first set of nodes has been patched, the administrator is prompted to shut down the instances on the remaining nodes. 

E. The patch must be propagated to and the inventory updated on all the remaining nodes before restarting the instances on the first set of nodes. 

Answer: D,E 

Explanation: 

Installing a Patch with Minimum Down Time with OPatch In minimum down-time patching, the nodes are divided into two sets. One set of nodes is shut down and the patch is applied to those nodes. After the first set of nodes has been patched, the second set of nodes is shut down. The first set of nodes is then restarted and the patch is applied to the second set of nodes. After the patch has been applied to the second set of nodes, those nodes are restarted. This method leads to less down time for Oracle RAC, compared to having all the nodes shut down at the same time. When you use the minimum down-time patching method, the following actions occur: The local node is always patched first. The local node is used as a base to patch the other nodes. The user is prompted for the first set of nodes to patch. For each node in this first set, the user is asked to stop the instance and then the patch is propagated and applied to that node before continuing to the next node. When the first set of nodes has been patched, the user is asked to shut down Clusterware on the remaining nodes. The instances are stopped on the last set of remote nodes. The patch is propagated to the last set of nodes and the inventory is updated. You can then start up the patched nodes (the first set of nodes) before patching the remaining nodes. 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 4 – 44 


Q32. When creating an Oracle Cluster database using DBCA the "Memory size (SGA and PGA)” field is supplied on value of 2000 MB. Identify the default block Size used for the database. 

A. 2 KB 

B. 4 KB 

C. 8 KB 

D. 16 KB 

E. 32 KB 

Answer: C 

Explanation: Type of LimitLimit Value 

Minimum2k.Must be a multiple of operating system physical block size MaximumOperating system dependent, but never more than 32 KB 

DBCA tab sizing 

In this tab, you specify the smallest block size and the maximum number of operating system user processes that can simultaneously connect to the database. In the Block Size list, enter the size in bytes or accept the default. Oracle Database data is stored in these blocks. One data block corresponds to a specific number of bytes of physical space on disk. While using pre-defined templates, this field is not enabled since the database will be created with the default block size of 8 KB. But while using the custom option, you can change block size. Selecting a block size other than the default 8 KB value requires advanced knowledge and should only be done when absolutely required. 

Oracle. Database 2 Day DBA 


Q33. Which two actions in a warehousing RAC database may cause concurrent cross-instance calls leading to I/O contention? 

A. truncate table statements 

B. select statements referring to non-partitioned tables 

C. drop table statements 

D. insert statements where each instance inserts into different partitions of a partitioned table 

Answer: A,C 

Explanation: 

Concurrent Cross-Instance Calls: Considerations In data warehouse and data mart environments, it is not uncommon to see a lot of TRUNCATE operations. These essentially happen on tables containing temporary data. In a RAC environment, truncating tables concurrently from different instances does not scale well, especially if, in conjunction, you are also using direct read operations such as parallel queries. As shown in the slide, a truncate operation requires a cross-instance call to flush dirty blocks of the table that may be spread across instances. This constitutes a point of serialization. So, while the first TRUNCATE command is processing, the second has to wait until the first one completes. There are different types of cross-instance calls. However, all use the same serialization mechanism. For example, the cache flush for a partitioned table with many partitions may add latency to a corresponding parallel query. This is because each cross-instance call is serialized at the cluster level, and one crossinstance call is needed for each partition at the start of the parallel query for direct read purposes. 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 14 – 27 What Application Design considerations should I be aware of when moving to Oracle RAC? The general principals are that fundamentally no different design and coding practices are required for RAC however application flaws in execution or design have a higher impact in RAC. The performance and scalability in RAC will be more sensitive to bad plans or bad schema design. Serializing contention makes applications less scalable. If your customer uses standard SQL and schema tuning, it solves > 80% of performance problems Some of the scaleability pitfalls they should look for are: 

* Serializing contention on a small set of data/index blocks --> monotonically increasing key --> frequent updates of small cached tables --> segment without automatic segment space management (ASSM) or Free List Group (FLG) 

* Full table scans --> Optimization for full scans in 11g can save CPU and latency 

* Frequent invalidation and parsing of cursors --> Requires data dictionary lookups and synchronizations 

* Concurrent DDL ( e.g. truncate/drop ) Look for: 

* Indexes with right-growing characteristics --> Use reverse key indexes --> Eliminate indexes which are not needed 

* Frequent updated and reads of “small” tables --> “small”=fits into a single buffer cache --> Use Sparse blocks ( PCTFREE 99 ) to reduce serialization 

* SQL which scans large amount of data --> Perhaps more efficient when parallelized --> Direct reads do not need to be globally synchronized ( hence less CPU for global cache ) RAC: Frequently Asked Questions [ID 220970.1] 


Q34. The System Global Area (SGA) for the ASM instance contains distinct memory areas. Choose three areas that are contained within the ASM SGA. 

A. Shared Pool 

B. Buffer Cache 

C. Log Buffer 

D. Large Pool 

E. ASM Cache 

F. Streams Pool 

Answer: A,D,E 

Explanation: Section: (none) 

The SGA in an ASM instance is different in memory allocation and usage than the SGA in a database instance. The SGA in the ASM instance is divided into four primary areas as follows: Shared Pool: Used for metadata information Large Pool: Used for parallel operations ASM Cache: Used for reading and writing blocks during rebalance operations Free Memory: Unallocated memory available D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration 


Q35. You want to check an ACFS for consistency on the Linux platform. Which command-line tool would you use to do this? 

A. advmutil 

B. asmcmd 

C. fsck 

D. acfsutil 

E. fdisk 

Answer: C 

Explanation: 

Dismounting an Oracle ACFS File System You can dismount a file system without deregistering the file system or disabling the volume on which the file system is mounted. For example, you can dismount a file system and run fsck to check the file system. # /bin/umount /u01/app/acfsmounts/myacfs # /sbin/fsck -a -v -y -t acfs /dev/asm/volume1-123 After you dismount a file system, you must explicitly mount the file system. 

1. Use umount on Linux systems or acfsdismount on Windows systems. For information about the commands to dismount a file system, see "umount" or "acfsdismount". 

2. Use fsck on Linux systems or acfschkdsk on Windows systems to check a file system. For information about the commands to check a file system, see "fsck" or "acfschkdsk". 

Oracle. Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2) 


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Q36. Your RAC database has a high volume of inserts into the SALES table. Sequence SALES_SEQ is used to generate primary key values. Examine the following query output: 

SQL> SELECT sequence_name, min_value, max_value, increment_by, cache_size FROM dba_sequences ; 

Output: 

What would you recommend to improve the response times? 

A. Increasing size of undo tablespaces 

B. increasing sequence cache sizes 

Answer: B 

Explanation: 

Oracle Sequences and Index Contention Indexes with key values generated by sequences tend to be subject to leaf block contention when the insert rate is high. That is because the index leaf block holding the highest key value is changed for every row inserted, as the values are monotonically ascending. In RAC, this may lead to a high rate of current and CR blocks transferred between nodes. One of the simplest techniques that can be used to limit this overhead is to increase the sequence cache, if you are using Oracle sequences. Because the difference between sequence values generated by different instances increases, successive index block splits tend to create instance affinity to index leaf blocks. For example, suppose that an index key value is generated by a CACHE NOORDER sequence and each index leaf block can hold 500 rows. If the sequence cache is set to 50000, while instance 1 inserts values 1, 2, 3, and so on, instance 2 concurrently inserts 50001, 50002, and so on. After some block splits, each instance writes to a different part of the index tree. So, what is the ideal value for a sequence cache to avoid inter-instance leaf index block contention, yet minimizing possible gaps? One of the main variables to consider is the insert rate: the higher it is, the higher must be the sequence cache. However, creating a simulation to evaluate the gains for a specific configuration is recommended. Note: By default, the cache value is 20. Typically, 20 is too small for the preceding example. 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 14 – 24 


Q37. Your four-node cluster was originally purchased, installed, and configured three years ago. You recently added another four nodes to the cluster. 

Now you want to remove two of the older nodes that are still accessible to be redeployed elsewhere in the data center. Which two are true regarding the procedure for removing one or more cluster nodes? 

A. The procedure requires that all commands be invoked from one of the surviving cluster nodes. 

B. All commands are run as root regardless of which nodes are used to invoke them. 

C. The procedure requires that some commands be invoked on the node or nodes to be removed and that some be invoked from all surviving cluster nodes. 

D. The procedure requires that some commands be invoked on the node or nodes to be removed and that some be invoked from one surviving cluster node. 

E. Some commands require that the name of the node or nodes to be removed are passed as arguments, and some commands require the name of existing nodes to be passed. 

Answer: D,E 

Explanation: 

. If you are deleting multiple nodes, then run the rootcrs.pl script on each node that you are deleting. . From any node that you are not deleting, run the following command from the Grid_home/bin directory as root to delete the node from the cluster: # crsctl delete node -n node_to_be_deleted 

. On the node you want to delete, run the following command as the user that installed Oracle Clusterware from the Grid_home/oui/bin directory where node_to_be_deleted is the name of the node that you are deleting: 

$ ./runInstaller -updateNodeList ORACLE_HOME=Grid_home "CLUSTER_NODES= {node_to_be_deleted}" CRS=TRUE -silent -local 

. On the node that you are deleting, depending on whether you have a shared or local Oracle home, complete one of the following procedures as the user that installed Oracle Clusterware: 

. For a local home, deinstall the Oracle Clusterware home from the node that you want to delete, as follows, by running the following command, where Grid_home is the path defined for the Oracle Clusterware home: 

On any node other than the node you are deleting, run the following command from the Grid_home /oui/bin directory where remaining_nodes_list is a comma-delimited list of the nodes that are going to remain part of your cluster: $ ./runInstaller -updateNodeList ORACLE_HOME=Grid_home "CLUSTER_NODES= {remaining_nodes_list}" CRS=TRUE -silent 

. Run the following CVU command to verify that the specified nodes have been 

successfully deleted from the cluster: $ cluvfy stage -post nodedel -n node_list [-verbose] Oracle. Clusterware Administration and Deployment Guide 


Q38. Which statement describes the requirements for the network interface names, such as eth0, in Oracle Clusterware? 

A. Only the public interface names must be the same for all nodes. 

B. Only the private interface names must be the same for all nodes. 

C. Both the public interface name and the private interface name must be the same for all nodes. 

D. Both the public interface name and the private interface name can vary on different nodes. 

E. Only the private interface names can be different on different nodes. 

F. Only the public interface names can be different on different nodes. 

Answer: C 

Explanation: 

Checking Network Requirements 

Each node must have at least two network interface cards (NICs). 

Interface names must be the same on all nodes. 

Public NIC must support TCP/IP and Private NIC UDP. 

Public IP must be registered in the domain name server (DNS) or the /etc/hosts file. 

# cat /etc/hosts 

##### Public Interfaces – eth0 (odd numbers)#### 

xxx.xxx.100.11 host01.example.com host01 

xxx.xxx.100.13 host02.example.com host02 IF GNS is used, the Cluster GNS address must be registered in the DNS. Prevent public network failures when using NAS devices or NFS mounts by starting the Name Service Cache Daemon. # /sbin/service nscd start 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 2 – 18 


Q39. How does the Oracle Grid Infrastructure administrator determine the location of the Oracle Clusterware voting disk? 

A. Run cat /etc/oracle/vote.loc from any node. 

B. Run srvctl query css votedisk from any node. 

C. Run crsctl query css votedisk from any node. 

D. Run select name, path from v$votedisk from any RAC database instance of any database on the cluster. 

Answer: C 

Explanation: 

Determining the Location of Oracle Clusterware Configuration Files You can determine the location of the voting disk by using the crsctl query css votedisk command on any node. D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 3 – 7 


Q40. The storage administrator is adding several disks to a pool of ASM disks. The current ASM_DISKSTRING parameter is "/dev/sda*", “/dev/sdb*”, “/dev/sd*6". There are several hundred disk partitions currently. 

The new disks are /dev/sdf1, /dev/sdg1, /dev/sdh1, and /dev/sdd6. 

Which ASM_DISKSTRING parameter would perform the best by searching the fewest number of devices for ASM discovery? 

A. ASM_DISKSTRING="/dev/sda*”, "/dev/sdb*", “/dev/sd*6",”/dev/sd*1" 

B. ASM_DISKSTRING="/dev/sda*”, "/dev/sdb*", “/dev/sd*6",”/dev/sd*" 

C. ASM_DISRSTRING="/dev/sd*" 

D. ASM_DISKSTRING="" 

E. ASM_DISKSTRING="/dev/sda*", "/dev/sdb*", "/dev/sd*6", "/dev/sdf1", "/dev/sdg1", "/dev/sdh1" 

Answer: E 

Explanation: 

Improving Disk Discovery Time The value for the ASM_DISKSTRING initialization parameter is an operating system–dependent value that Oracle ASM uses to limit the set of paths that the discovery process uses to search for disks. When a new disk is added to a disk group, each Oracle ASM instance that has the disk group mounted must be able to discover the new disk using its ASM_DISKSTRING. 

Oracle. Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2) 



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